Workplace Accidents Don’t Have to Ruin Injury Victims Financially, Too

“Juan” was really good at putting up siding. Vinyl siding, wood siding, veneers, even stucco; Juan could hang it quickly and hang it properly. He’d quickly become “the man” for siding at the small construction firm where he had begun working a few weeks earlier.

That’s why Juan (not a real person) was part of the two-man crew that the company had assigned that morning to a last-minute, rush siding job that had been called in late the previous afternoon. The home in question had just been put up for sale and was scheduled for an open house the following week. The job needed to be finished as quickly as possible.

Unfortunately, when Juan and his colleague arrived at the job site, they discovered that the logistics manager had failed to deliver adequate scaffolding or any of the safety harnesses that were typically used when working high off the ground. Juan called the office. His boss told him that he would have the missing gear brought out to the site, but that Juan shouldn’t wait for it. “This is a rush job,” he said, repeating what Juan already knew. “Do what you have to do to get started.”

Hours after his call with his boss, the needed equipment still had not been delivered. That is how Juan came to be working 25 feet off the ground that afternoon, held to the scaffolding by nothing but a makeshift rope lasso he had fashioned during his lunch break. It was uncomfortable, but it was holding fast – until, that is, Juan shifted his weight to pull loose a piece of old siding. He had performed that motion thousands of times before without incident, but that had been while wearing a full safety harness.

The knot on the makeshift rope support gave way, and Juan fell more than two stories to a concrete patio.

That was three years ago. Juan’s left leg was essentially destroyed by multiple compound fractures and, despite the best efforts of orthopedic surgeons, eventually had to be partially amputated. Juan was fitted with a prosthesis. Still only 41 years old, he now needs a cane to walk and suffers from constant pain. His work in construction is over, and his prospects for future employment are cloudy, at best.

Juan’s friends helped him locate an attorney, who took his case and told him he had a good chance of winning a judgment or settlement from his former employer. That didn’t help Juan pay his bills now, though. As Juan faced the threat of eviction from his apartment, his attorney put him in touch with USClaims.

USClaims approved Juan’s application for pre-settlement funding quickly, and he had the money he needed to catch up on his rent and utilities just a few days later.

Today, as his attorney negotiates for a fair injury settlement, Juan is learning to drive a car with his leg prosthesis. He’s hoping to find work as a chauffeur or taxi driver, and he’s worried that his artificial leg is going to keep employers from seriously considering him. But with pre-settlement funding from USClaims, he’s no longer worried about where he’s going to sleep next month. If you’re having trouble meeting your expenses while waiting for a legal settlement or a judgment, we can help.

At USClaims, we offer pre-settlement funding, if a case is qualified for pre-settlement funding then we would purchase a portion of the proceeds of the anticipated court judgment or settlement for some cash now. USClaims only gets paid if a case is won or has reached a settlement! Apply now or call us today at 1-877-USCLAIMS to learn more.

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